Word Rebus

  • Word Rebus
  • A word rebus is an arrangement of letters and words that cryptically represent another word, phrase, or common saying.
  • Here’s an example:
    1. ME REPEAT
  • Solution to this rebus: Repeat after me.
  • Get it?
  • Types of Word Rebuses
  • According to fun-with-words.com, there are different types of word rebuses. You may use these types to create your own word rebus puzzles.
    1. Position
  • The example shown above uses the positioning of words. You can position two words to represent after, before, above, below, in and other such prepositions.
  • Here’s another example of a word rebus that uses positioning:
    1. CARRENATION
  • (See below for the solution to this and the other rebuses.)
  • Color
  • You can use text color to suggest a word.
  • Here are a couple of examples:
    1. BELT
    1. BERET
  • Pointing
  • You may point to a specific word in a collection of words by using an arrow or by underlining.
  • Here are a couple of examples in which a word is emphasized:
    1. AID ←
      AID
      AID
    2. AMENDMENT AMENDMENT
      AMENDMENT
      AMENDMENT
  • Style
  • You can change the style or size of the font to suggest a word.
  • Here are a couple of examples:
    1. ACTION
    1. I AM you
  • Direction
  • The direction in which the letters are printed (down or back, for example) may suggest missing words.
  • Here are a couple of examples:
    1. C
      O
      U
      N
      T
    2. DEEF
  • Partial letters or words
  • You may hide parts of letters or words to suggest missing words.
  • Here are a couple of examples:
  • Top of the word MORNING
    1. ECLI
  • Solutions
  • 1. Repeat after me 2. Reincarnation 3. Black belt 4. Green beret 5. First aid 6. Second amendment 7. Bold action 8. I am bigger than you 9. Countdown 10. Feedback 11. Top of the morning 12. Partial eclipse
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  • Using Word Rebus Puzzles
  • If you attended our webinar series, you’d know that puzzles could be used in training in three different ways:
    1. To teach specific types of thinking skills such as creative thinking, lateral thinking, logical thinking, or critical thinking.
    2. To review a lecture or a handout by having participants solve a puzzle that summarizes the content.
    3. To explore interpersonal skills and concepts by incorporating an appropriate puzzle in a simulation game.
  • Here’s an example of a simulation game with an embedded word rebus puzzle:
  • Distribute a handout with these nine word rebus puzzles. Ask the participants to solve them independently. Tell them not to help one another.
  •  
  •  
  • ME QUIT
    NOON GOOD
    BOJACKX                     
    ARREST
    YOU ARE
    TIMING
    TIM ING
    DCTNRY
    THER
    DEILST
    TRN
  •  
  •  
  • Machine generated alternative text: ME QUIT ARREST YOU ARE THER NOON GOOD TIMING TIM ING DEILST BOJACKX DCTNRY TRN
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  • After 3 minutes, ask everyone to stop and have each participant count the number of puzzles that she has solved.
  • Go through the handout, one item at a time, and ask the participants to shout out the answer. Usually one or more participants give the solution to each item. If there is a tough item that nobody has solved, skip it.
  • Count the total number of items solved by the group as a whole. Ask how many individuals have independently solved that many items.
  • The participants easily figure out the learning point: The group is smarter than any of its individual members.
  • (Solutions: Quit following me, good afternoon, Jack in the box, you are under arrest, split second timing, abridged dictionary, almost there, listed in alphabetical order, and no u-turn)