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WCA Syllabus 2017 Flipbook

Lincoln University
English 82A – Written Communication I
Course Syllabus

Course: Written Communication I
Department and number: English 82A
Prerequisites/Co-requisites: None
Semester: Fall 2017 – Thursdays, 9:00-11:45
Credit: 3 units, 45 lecture hours

Instructor: Dr. Sylvia Y. Schoemaker Rippel
Office hours and location: T, Th 11:45-12:30 and by arrangement, room 308
Office Phone: 510-628-8036
University instructor email: sysr@lincolnuca.edu
Course-related email for the semester: profsylvia@gmail.com

Course Description
(Current University Catalog Description)
Eng. 82A & 82B – Written Communication I & II

First term: A thorough study of grammar and the fundamentals of composition. Practice in writing themes, book reviews and other short papers is given. Particular attention is directed toward sentence structure, syntax, and general rhetorical principles. Second term: Critical reading and evaluation of selected texts and writings; composition of well-organized expository papers; a careful consideration of methods of research, organization in a clear, logical manner and other elements involved in writing research papers. (3 + 3 units)

Objectives
Students will develop their writing skills for academic, professional, and socio-cultural purposes, in mode-centered essay writing. Students will learn editing, documentation skills, use of pre, during, and post writing strategies, topic mapping and other resources
Students will demonstrate written communication skills in writing and presenting their essays for personal, peer and instructor evaluation based on established rubrics, including competencies in planning, drafting, editing, and documentation skills.

Learning Outcomes and Assessment Activities
Course Learning Outcome
Successful students are able to:
Assessment Activities
As demonstrated by successful completion of or participation in:
1
Demonstrate progressive development of writing skills for academic, professional, and socio-cultural purposes, using skillful application of critical and creative thinking strategies in the pre, during, and post writing process
Completed written work, demonstrating communicative competencies in content, form, style, grammar, mechanics
Oral presentations
Class discussion
Peer evaluation
ePortfolio
Instructor evaluation
2
Appropriately use topic specification, writing planning, researching, design, development, editing, and documentation
Mode-centered, audience-oriented, well-executed grammatically and stylistically, punctually presented writing in assigned weekly homework and course essay writing
3
Apply topic mapping and other writing development resources
Completed written work
4
Demonstrate written communication skills in writing and presenting essays for personal, peer and instructor evaluation
Completed written work
Peer evaluation
Instructor evaluation
5
Compose well-organized written communications suitable for personal, academic, and professional purposes
Assigned essays
Completed written work
Peer evaluation
Instructor evaluation

Instructional Materials and References
Required Text:
VanderMey, R., Meyer, V., Van Rys, J. & Sebranek, P. (2015). The college writer: A guide to thinking, writing, and researching (5th ed.). Boston: Houghton Mifflin. ·
(ISBN-10: 1285437950 ISBN-13: 9781285437958)

Recommended texts and other resources:

Writer’s handbook, online guides and reference tools (to be announced)

Student text site:
http://college.cengage.com/english/vandermey/college_writer/1e/students/index.html

Instructional Methodology
The course sessions will include lectures, A/V-augmented presentations (text-based and other topically related slides and relevant audio/video/web resources), written and oral classroom exercises and readings applying course concepts, small group and classroom discussions, student presentations of individual and group assignments based on course units, with emphasis on student engagement in learning by doing.

Student Responsibilities
Students are expected to consistently attend class punctually and fully (arriving on time and leaving the classroom only at the scheduled break and end times). Successful students participate in individual and group work in a productive manner, prepare and perform well on tests, complete assignments according to schedule and at a level appropriate to university rubrics, and take personal responsibility for meeting the objectives of the course.
Topical Outline
English 82A covers the aspects of composing well-organized written communications. The core of the course will emphasize practice in organizing ideas in a clear, logical manner and other elements involved in writing papers in descriptive, narrative, analytical, and persuasive rhetorical contexts. Student and professional writing models will be used throughout the units.

Homework Assignments
Students will complete three essays: descriptive/reflective, informative, and persuasive. In addition, for each of the course assignments, students will do the following:
· Read and reflect on assigned units as outlined on the course schedule.
· Review and respond to the assignments in writing (a brief paragraph or two). In your response, outline the key questions and answers generated by your reading and reflection.
· Email your assignments to me at profsylvia@gmail.com.
Midterm and final review ePortfolio/PowerPoint presentations will be based on your course work.

Schedule

Session #
Date
Unit
1
24-Aug
1 Intro Assignments and readings are from The College Writer (TCW) — Each chapter contains an Intro, an Overview, Guidelines, Example Readings, and Writing Checklist/Activities) Selected Model readings will be given in class.
2
31-Aug
I. A Rhetoric: College Student’s Guide to Writing Brief Overview Chapters I. Reading, Thinking, Viewing, and Writing 1. Critical Thinking The Writing Process 2. Beginning the Writing Process 3. Planning
3
7-Sep
4. Drafting 5. Revising 6. Editing and Proofreading 7. Submitting, Writing, and Creating Portfolios The College Essay 8. One Writer’s Process 9. Forms of College Writing 10. Narration, Description, and Reflection
4
14-Sep
Unit I (Narrative, Descriptive, and Reflective Writing) Paper Due — Review & Presentations
5
21-Sep
Unit II — Analytical Writing 11. Cause and Effect.
Strategies for Cause-Effect Essays. Sample Cause-Effect Essays.
6
28-Sep
12. Comparison and Contrast. Strategies for Comparison-Contrast Essays. Sample Comparison-Contrast Essays.
7
5-Oct
13. Classification.
Strategies for Classification Essays. Sample Classification Essays.
14. Process. Strategies for Process Essays. Sample Process Essays.
Review ePortfolio/PPt I due
8
8-Oct
Midterm
9
12-Oct
15. Definition.
Strategies for Definition Essays. Sample Definition Essays.
10
26-Oct
16. Reading Literature: A Case Study in Analysis.
Strategies for Analyzing Literature and the Arts. Approaches to Literary Analysis.
11
2-Nov
Unit II (Analytical Writing ) Paper Due Unit III Persuasive Writing 17. Strategies for Argumentation and Persuasion.
12
9 Nov
18.Taking a Position
19. Persuading Readers to Act
13
16-Nov
20. Proposing a Solution

23-Nov
Fall Recess (Nov 21-25)
14
30-Nov
C21 Taking Essay Exams
Unit III (Persuasive Writing) Paper Due –Presentations
Review ePortfolio/PPt II due
15
7-Dec
Final

Assessment Criteria & Method of Evaluating Students
Students will demonstrate their level of proficiency and achievement through appropriate and accurate application of written communication theory and skills. Assessments of improved competence in writing descriptive, narrative, informative, and persuasive essays and personal and peer evaluations and reflections are fundamental to the grades attained.

Items
Points
Class Work: oral and written exercises
20
Midterm
25
E-Portfolio I, II
10
Presentations
10
Final exam
35
Total
100

Points
Grade
100-95
A
94-90
A-
89-87
B+
86-84
B
83-80
B-
79-77
C+
76-74
C
73-70
C-
69-65
D+
64-60
D
59 or less
F

Please note:
Revisions to the schedule will be announced in class as needed. Class attendance is required. Required textbooks must be obtained as soon as possible and brought to class for each session. Class participation is required for enhanced learning through applied content, group interactions, and individual and small group presentations. Plagiarized content is strictly prohibited: Researched materials must be documented using a consistent style for both in-text and end-text citations of sources using the published standards of the most recent subject-appropriate style guide, such as APA (social sciences) or MLA (humanities), for example. Missed exams and assignments require certified excuses (signed documentation by an appropriate medical or other official representative). With documentation, a makeup exam may be scheduled. Electronics are not allowed during exams. Cell phones should not be active during class sessions.

Revised: 8/2017

 03 –Unit I: Narrative Writing

03 –Unit I: Narrative Writing

4. Drafting
5. Revising
6. Editing and Proofreading
7. Submitting, Writing, and Creating Portfolios
The College Essay
8. One Writer’s Process

Intro Video:

http://wcamatters.blogspot.com/2017/01/narrativedescriptive-essay-writing.html

Topics: http://wcamatters.blogspot.com/search/label/Topics


Chapter 9. Forms of College Writing



Narrative Essay Writing

[Narration+and++++Description++++Topics.png]

Narrative Essays

As a mode of expository writing, the narrative approach, more than any other, offers writers a chance to think and write about themselves. We all have experiences lodged in our memories which are worthy of sharing with readers. Yet sometimes they are so fused with other memories that a lot of the time spent in writing narrative is in the prewriting stage.

In this stage, writers first need to select an incident worthy of writing about and, second, to find relevance in that incident. To do this, writers might ask themselves what about the incident provided new insights or awareness. Finally, writers must dredge up details which will make the incident real for readers.

PRINCIPLES OF WRITING NARRATIVE ESSAYS

Once an incident is chosen, the writer should keep three principles in mind.

    1. Remember to involve readers in the story. It is much more interesting to actually recreate an incident for readers than to simply tell about it.
  • Find a generalization which the story supports. This is the only way the writer’s personal experience will take on meaning for readers. This generalization does not have to encompass humanity as a whole; it can concern the writer, men, women, or children of various ages and backgrounds.
  • Remember that although the main component of a narrative is the story, details must be carefully selected to support, explain, and enhance the story.

CONVENTIONS OF NARRATIVE ESSAYS

In writing your narrative essay, keep the following conventions in mind.

    • Narratives are generally written in the first person, that is, using “I.” However, third person (“he,” “she,” or “it”) can also be used.
  • Narratives rely on concrete, sensory details to convey their point. These details should create a unified, forceful effect, a dominant impression.
  • Narratives, as stories, should include these story conventions: a plot, including setting and characters; a climax; and an ending.

Rhetorical Functions

KWs:

Bio Poem

Bio Poem

 How to Write a BioPoem

(Line 1) First name
(Line 2) Three or four adjectives that describe the person
(Line 3) Important relationship (daughter of . . . , mother of . . . , etc)
(Line 4) Two or three things, people, or ideas that the person loved
(Line 5) Three feelings the person experienced
(Line 6) Three fears the person experienced
(Line 7) Accomplishments (who composed . . . , who discovered . . . , etc.)
(Line 8) Two or three things the person wanted to see happen or wanted to experience
(Line 9) His or her residence
(Line 10) Last name
———————————————————————————————————

Biopoem Sample
Rosa
Determined, brave, strong, loving
Wife of Raymond Parks, mother of all children
Who loved equality, freedom, and the benefits of a good education
Who hated discrimination, loved to stand up for her beliefs, and loved to help others
Who feared that racism would continue, feared losing the opportunity to make a difference, and feared that young people might lose opportunities to develop strength and courage
Who changed history as she accomplished great strides for equality and encouraged excellence for all
Who wanted to see love triumph and see an end to all bias and discrimination in a world in which respect is freely given to all
Born in Alabama and living in Detroit
Parks

From Abromitis, B.S. (1994, June/July). Bringing lives to life. Biographies in reading and the content areas. Reading Today, 11, 26. Reprinted with permission of the publisher and author.

Copyright 2004 IRA/NCTE. All rights reserved

Where Do You Stand?

Where do you stand with regard to writing?
FEET: What do I stand for as a foundation of writing?
STOMACH: What upsets me about writing?
HEART: What do I love about writing?
HANDS: What do I feel about writing?
EARS: What do I hear about writing?
EYES: What do I see about writing?
BRAIN: What do I think about writing?

— 01 — Introduction

— 01 — Introduction

Syllabus

Intro Assignments and readings are from The College Writer (TCW) — Each chapter contains an Intro, an Overview, Guidelines, Example Readings, and Writing Checklist/Activities) Selected Model readings will be given in class.

Text Unit I:
A Rhetoric: College Student’s Guide to Writing

Preliminaries:

E-mail, E-list

Mind-Mapping

Blogging, Wikiing, Sites and Docs

Where do you stand? (Assigned – by email)

Bio Poem (In class and by email)

Posts List – TITLE

 

Semantic Context

========================================================================

Semantic Context

Focus On

 

Who

Describe People
including
Self, Family, Group

What

Describe Things
such as an object, a favorite thing, your (house, room vehicle)

Where

Describe Places
Your city of birth, your last vacation place, places to go

When

Narrate Times
Including favorite holiday,
birthday, season

Why

Argue Reasons
Arguing a point of view for/against smoking, gambling, the lottery, etc.

How

Explicate
Processes involving
How-to writing telling the steps involved in a hobby, sports, skill

Writing A to Z

Writing A to Z

Item Topic Questions

A

Assignments
Which do you like? Which are impossible, disliked? How do you go about doing your class assignments?
 Activities
What activities do you enjoy?

B

Background
What is your background (home country, family, academic experience, work experience, special skills
 Baseball
Do you like baseball? Do you follow any baseball teams?

C

Career
What career are you working towards?
Creativity
What is creativity? A re you creative in a particular area (music, art, writing….)

D

Dreams
Do you believe dreams reveal something about you? What are your dreams for the future?
Daydreams
What are daydreams?
What do you daydream about?

E

Energy
What do you think about the energy crisis? What options are there? Which is best?
Environment
How can we protect our environment?

F

Favorite
What is your favorite (food, movie, activity, color …..)? Why?
 Fashion
What is in fashion/ out of fashion?
Are fashions worthwhile? 
 Father
How would you describe your father? What makes a good father?

G

Grammar
What grammar problems do you think you have? What have you done to improve your English grammar
 Games
What games did you play as a child? What games do you find fun now?

H

Holidays Happiness
What is your favorite holiday? What holidays are special to your home country? What does it take to make you happy? Do you think money is a major factor in being happy?

I

Imagination Image
Do you have a good imagination? Do you think imagination is important? Has image become too important in politics? What do you think contributes to a good image?

J

Jokes Jack-of-all-trades
Do you like jokes? Do you think a sense of humor is important? Why? A re you (or do you know) a jack-of-all-trades ( A person who can do many different kinds of work)? What are you especially skilled at?

K

Karate
Do you know karate? What are the advantages/disadvantages of learning karate?
 Karma
 Do you believe in a personal karma (used informally to mean fate or destiny)? If so, what do you think is your karma?

L

Life
What is your greatest ambition in life? What is needed for a happy life?
Love
What is love? Who/what do you love? Why?

M

Mother
How would you describe your mother? What makes a good mother?
Music
What is your favorite music? What music do you find unbearable?

N

Nostalgia
A re you nostalgic (long for things, persons, or situations of the past)? Why? For what?
Neighbors
  Do you know your neighbors? If so, how would you describe them? A re you a good neighbor? Why?

O

 Optimism
A re you optimistic? If so, how did you become an optimist? If not, why not? 
Opinion
Whose opinion do you value most? Why?

P

Pessimism
Are you pessimistic? If so, how did you become pessimistic? If not, why not? 
Peace
 Do you think world peace is possible? What can we do

Q

Questions
What is the biggest question you have about your future? What are you doing to answer the question?
Quirk
 Do you (or does someone you know) have a quirk (peculiarity of behavior or idiosyncrasy)? If so, what? How do you deal with it?

R

Recreation
What is your favorite form of recreation? What benefits do you derive from it?
Reason
 Do you base your actions on reason, on emotion or on both reason and emotion? Why?

S

Seasons
What is your favorite season (summer, winter, spring, fall/ rainy, dry)? Why?
Solitude
 Do you prefer solitude to being in company? If so, why? If not, why not?

T

Travel
Do you like to travel? What was your favorite place to visit? What was your least favorite?
Truth
 Is it always better to tell the truth or is it sometimes best to lie?

U

UFO
Do you think UFO’s from other worlds exist? What would you do if you saw a UFO?
Unforgettable…
 What is you most unforgettable moment? Why?

V

Vacation
What was your favorite vacation? What do you think is the perfect vacation?
Victory
 What is your greatest victory? Explain

W

Writing
What do you like to write about? What kind of writing do you prefer to read?
Wisdom
  What wisdom have you discovered? Explain

X

Xenophobia
Do you know anyone who is xenophobic (exceedingly fearful of strangers)?
Why do you think a person would become a xenophobe?
Xerox Copy
 What is the best (worst) thing about Xerox copy machines? Why do you think there is a need for 24-hour a day Xerox copy places? Explain.

Y

Youth
What is the best thing about youth? What is the worst thing?
Yesterday
 If you had one yesterday to live again, which day would that be? Why?

Z

Zen
What are some of the major tenets of Zen Buddhism? What do you think of them?
Zombie
What do you think about the zombie (the walking dead) theme in literature? Explain.